• Kirsty McMullan, The Everyday Museum of Everyday Portland
  • Kirsty McMullan, The Everyday Museum of Everyday Portland
  • Kirsty McMullan, The Everyday Museum of Everyday Portland
  • Kirsty McMullan, The Everyday Museum of Everyday Portland
  • Kirsty McMullan, The Everyday Museum of Everyday Portland

Kirsty McMullen wins RIBA Eye Line competition

Kirsty McMullen, who graduated from RIBA Part 1 last year and is currently working at Spacecraft Architects, was declared joint winner with Amelia Hunter of the Royal College of Art. Their projects were described as “both grounded in place and demonstrat(ing) the beauty of possibility.” Kirsty’s submission was part of her final degree project “Everyday Museum of Everyday Portland” which was tutored by Kate Cheyne and Catrina Stewart in Studio 06.

The Eye Line competition invites students to create an outstanding 2D representation of a building or building concept with the aim of recognising the pure art of architecture with the emphasis on depiction of a concept, as distinct from functionality or buildability.

The judges were: architect, academic and noted draughtsman Alan Dunlop; artist Susanna Heron (a frequent collaborator with architects); last year’s winner Tom Noonan, presently working on rebuilding his alma mater the Bartlett with Hawkins\Brown; Narinder Sagoo, partner with Foster and Partners and organised by Hugh Pearman and colleague Eleanor Young.

Judge Susanna Heron commented: “Kirsty has made her drawings move, yet she is not trying to impress us.” Although the judges were impressed with every single one of Kirsty’s three “very strong” entries.

“The puppetry suggested by the expressive hands on the section is a thought-provoking way of showing images and, not content just to use these images of hands plucking at strings, McMullan also gave them a sense of animation with a series of drawings, almost like an artist’s cartoon or early preparatory sketch where conditionality is everything.

“This was a very deliberate attempt to expose the influence of the architect/curator in these drawings for Kirsty’s Part 1 project at the University of Brighton for the Everyday Museum of Everyday Portland…So was the use of Letraset-style annotations, that set off an interesting discussion among the judges about the importance of these letters to them. They were used with an artistic and discerning eye and made up for a thought-provoking set of drawings. I am going to go on thinking about that,” said Heron.

Commenting more generally on this year’s competition, Alan Dunlop said: “The second year of Eye Line has produced an even more remarkable series of images from clearly talented young architects and artists. Although the work overall was deeply impressive, the hand-drawn images of the joint winners were stunning and, frankly, humbling.”